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A scene from the film "Interview with the Vampire", with Kirsten Dunst as Claudia and Tom Cruise as Lestat de Lioncourt, 1994.

A scene from the film
A scene from the film
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A scene from the film
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A scene from the film
A scene from the film "Interview with the Vampire", with Kirsten Dunst as Claudia and Tom Cruise as Lestat de Lioncourt, 1994.
$19.90
  • SKU: SCAN-NOP-00483538

Description

A scene from the film "Interview with the Vampire", with Kirsten Dunst as Claudia and Tom Cruise as Lestat de Lioncourt, 1994. Interview with the Vampire is a 1994 American drama horror film directed by Neil Jordan, based on the 1976 novel Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice, and starring Tom Cruise and Brad Pitt. The film focuses on Lestat (Cruise) and Louis (Pitt), beginning with Louis's transformation into a vampire by Lestat in 1791. The film chronicles their time together, and their turning of a twelve-year-old girl, Claudia, into a vampire. The narrative is framed by a present-day interview, in which Louis tells his story to a San Francisco reporter. The supporting cast features Christian Slater, Kirsten Dunst, and Antonio Banderas. The film was released in November 1994 to generally positive reviews,[3] and received Oscar nominations for Best Art Direction and Best Original Score.[4] Kirsten Dunst was also nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film. In modern-day San Francisco, reporter Daniel Molloy interviews Louis de Pointe du Lac, who claims to be a vampire. Louis begins by describing his transformation into a vampire in Spanish Louisiana in 1791, at age 24, by the vampire Lestat de Lioncourt. Louis sought to die following the deaths of his dear wife and child; Lestat offered Louis the death he craved, but Louis asks to live instead. Lestat turns Louis and teaches him how to live as a vampire. At first, Louis rebels against hurting humans, drinking animal blood instead. He finally succumbs and kills his faithful house slave Yvette. Guilt ridden, he tries to kill himself by setting fire to his house, but Lestat rescues him and they flee. Wandering the streets of New Orleans, amid an outbreak of plague, Louis finds an ill little girl in a house with her dead, decomposing mother who still sits in her rocking chair. He bites the girl, Claudia, whom Lestat later transforms into a vampire "daughter." Lestat hopes that Claudia's transformation will discourage Louis from leaving. As thirty years pass, Claudia matures psychologically but still remains a little girl in appearance. She has become a sadistic killer who closely bonds with Louis and Lestat. But, when she finally realizes she will never grow up and have an adult body of her own, thus being trapped in the form of a child forever, she is furious with Lestat and finds herself deeply hating him for making her a vampire. She finally attempts to trick him into drinking the blood of twin boys she killed by overdosing them with laudanum, knowing that blood from a corpse is fatal to vampires. This weakens him, and she slits his throat. Claudia and Louis dump Lestat's body in a swamp; but he returns, having drained the blood of swamp creatures to survive. Lestat attacks them, but Louis sets him on fire and is able to flee to Paris with Claudia. In 1870, Louis and Claudia live in harmony in Paris, but Louis encounters vampires Santiago and Armand; Armand invites Louis and Claudia to his coven, the Théâtre des Vampires, where they witness Armand and his coven dispatching a terrified human woman before an unsuspecting human audience. Claudia rightly accuses Louis of wanting to abandon her for Armand. She demands he turn a human woman, Madeleine, to be her new protector and companion, and he reluctantly complies. As punishment for Lestat's murder, the Parisian vampires abduct all three; they imprison Louis in a metal coffin. When freed by Armand the next night, he learns Claudia and Madeleine have been exposed to sunlight against their will and turned to ash. He returns to the Theater and avenges Claudia and Madeleine by burning the vampires as they sleep and bisecting Santiago with a scythe. Armand arrives in time to help Louis escape and once again offers him a place by his side. Louis refuses, knowing that Armand choreographed Claudia and Madeline's demise to have Louis all to himself, and he leaves Armand for good. As decades pass, Louis explores the world alone, still grieving for Claudia, before returning to the United States. In 1988, he returns to New Orleans and finds Lestat, a mere shadow of his former self. Lestat asks Louis to rejoin him, but Louis rejects him and leaves. At this point, Louis concludes the interview, claiming that his experiences have resulted in his becoming the "very spirit of preternatural flesh; detached, unchangeable, empty." Molloy is shocked by this statement and openly declares his desire to have had Louis's experiences as a vampire. He asks Louis to transform him. Louis is immediately outraged by Molloy's complete disregard for the pervasive suffering caused by vampirism outlined in the interview. Louis bodily lifts Molloy up and pins him against the ceiling. In the next instant, Louis vanishes. Molloy hurriedly runs to his car and drives away, feeling happy with his interview as he plays it through the cassette player. Just then, Lestat appears and attacks him, taking control of the car. Revived by Molloy's blood, they drive off into the San Francisco night, taking out the cassette and turning on the radio, which is playing a Guns N' Roses cover of "Sympathy for the Devil" by the The Rolling Stones. And Lestat prepares to make the same offer to Malloy he once did to Louis. Kirsten Caroline Dunst (/'k?rst?n/; born April 30, 1982) is an American actress, singer and model. She made her film debut in Woody Allen's short film Oedipus Wrecks for the anthology film New York Stories (1989). At the age of twelve, Dunst gained widespread recognition as vampire Claudia in Interview with the Vampire (1994), a role for which she was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress. She appeared in Little Women the same year and in Jumanji the following year. After a recurring role in the NBC medical drama ER (1996–97) as Charlie Chemingo and co-starring in films such as Wag the Dog (1997), Small Soldiers (1998) and The Virgin Suicides (1999), Dunst transitioned into romantic comedies and comedy-dramas, starring in Drop Dead Gorgeous (1999), Bring It On (2000), Get Over It and Crazy/Beautiful (both released in 2001). Dunst achieved international fame for her portrayal of Mary Jane Watson in Sam Raimi's Spider-Man trilogy (2002–07). Since then, her films have included the romantic comedy Wimbledon (2004), the science fiction romantic comedy-drama Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) and Cameron Crowe's romantic tragicomedy Elizabethtown (2005). She played the title role in Sofia Coppola's biographical film Marie Antoinette (2006) and starred in the comedy film How to Lose Friends & Alienate People (2008). She won the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival and the Saturn Award for Best Actress for her performance in Lars von Trier's Melancholia (2011). In 2001, Dunst made her singing debut in the film Get Over It, in which she performed two songs. She also sang the jazz song "After You've Gone" for the end credits of the film The Cat's Meow (2001). She starred in season two of the FX series Fargo in 2015, playing the role of Peggy Blomquist, a slightly delusional and neurotic hairdresser. Her performance garnered widespread critical acclaim, leading to her wining the Critics' Choice Television Award for Best Actress in a Movie/Miniseries and being nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film. Dunst was born in Point Pleasant, New Jersey, to Inez (née Rupprecht) and Klaus Dunst.[1] She has a younger brother, Christian.[2] Her father worked as a medical services executive, and her mother worked for Lufthansa as a flight attendant[3][4] and was an artist and one-time gallery owner.[5] Dunst's father is German, originally from Hamburg, and Dunst's mother, who was born in New Jersey, is of German and Swedish descent.[6][7][8] Until the age of eleven, Dunst lived in Brick Township, New Jersey, where she attended Ranney School.[9] In 1993, her parents separated, and she subsequently moved with her mother and brother to Los Angeles, California, where she attended Laurel Hall School in North Hollywood. In 1995, her mother filed for divorce.[5] The following year Dunst began attending Notre Dame High School, a private Roman Catholic high school in Los Angeles. After graduating from Notre Dame High School in 2000, Dunst continued the acting career that she had begun.[2] As a teenager, she found it difficult to deal with her rising fame, and for a period she blamed her mother for pushing her into acting as a child. However, she later expressed that her mother "always had the best intentions".[10] When asked if she had any regrets about the way she spent her childhood, Dunst said: "Well, it's not a natural way to grow up, but it's the way I grew up and I wouldn't change it. I have my stuff to work out ... I don't think anybody can sit around and say, 'My life is more screwed up than yours.' Everybody has their issues."[11] Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV; July 3, 1962) is an American actor and filmmaker. Cruise has been nominated for three Academy Awards and has won three Golden Globe Awards. He started his career at age 19 in the 1981 film Endless Love. After portraying supporting roles in Taps (1981) and The Outsiders (1983), his first leading role was in the romantic comedy Risky Business, released in August 1983. Cruise became a full-fledged movie star after starring as Pete "Maverick" Mitchell in the action drama Top Gun (1986). Since 1996, he has been well known for his role as secret agent Ethan Hunt in the Mission: Impossible film series, whose most recent film, Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation, was released in 2015. One of the biggest movie stars in Hollywood,[2][3] Cruise starred in several more successful films in the 1980s, including the dramas The Color of Money (1986), Cocktail (1988), Rain Man (1988), and Born on the Fourth of July (1989). In the 1990s, he starred in a number of hit films, including the romance Far and Away (1992), the drama A Few Good Men (1992), the legal thriller The Firm (1993), the romantic horror film Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles (1994), the romantic comedy-drama sports film Jerry Maguire (1996), the erotic thriller Eyes Wide Shut, and the drama Magnolia (both 1999). In the 2000s, Cruise starred in a number of successful films, including the science fiction thrillers Vanilla Sky (2001) and Minority Report (2002), the epic war film The Last Samurai (2003), the crime film Collateral (2004), the science fiction disaster thriller film War of the Worlds (2005), the war drama Lions for Lambs (2007), the historical thriller Valkyrie (2008), the action comedy Knight and Day (2010), the thriller Jack Reacher (2012), the post-apocalyptic science fiction film Oblivion (2013), and the military science fiction film Edge of Tomorrow (2014). In 2012, Cruise was Hollywood's highest-paid actor.[4] Sixteen of his films grossed over $100 million domestically; twenty-two have grossed in excess of $200 million worldwide.[5] He has won Golden Globe Awards for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture in Drama in 1990 for Born on the Fourth of July; Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture in Comedy/Musical in 1997 for Jerry Maguire; and Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture in 2000 for Magnolia. In 2002, Cruise won the Saturn Award for Best Actor for Vanilla Sky. In 2003, he won an AFI Movie of the Year Award for The Last Samurai and an Empire Award for Best Actor for Minority Report. Cruise is an outspoken advocate for the Church of Scientology and its associated social programs, and credits it with helping him overcome dyslexia. In the 2000s his criticisms of psychiatry and anti-depressant drugs, particularly therapy for 9/11 rescue workers, and efforts to promote Scientology as a religion in Europe, sparked controversies, as did a leaked video interview of him promoting Scientology.[6] Cruise was born as Thomas Cruise Mapother IV in Syracuse, New York, the son of Mary Lee (née Pfeiffer), a special education teacher, and Thomas Cruise Mapother III (1934–84),[7] an electrical engineer.[8] Cruise has three sisters, Lee Anne, Marian, and Cass. Cruise's surname originates from his great-grandfather, born Thomas Cruise O'Mara, Jr., who was renamed "Thomas Cruise Mapother".[9][10][11] Cruise is of Irish,[12] German, and English ancestry.[13] One of his paternal great-great-great-grandfathers, Patrick Russell Cruise, was born in north County Dublin, in 1799; he married Teresa Johnson in Warrenstown House, County Meath, in 1825. They left Ireland for America that same year and settled in New York.[12] Patrick and Teresa had a daughter, Mary Paulina Russell Cruise, whose son Thomas O'Mara, Jr. was Tom's great-grandfather through his direct paternal line.[14] Cruise grew up in near poverty, and had a Catholic upbringing. The family was dominated by his abusive father, whom Cruise has described as "a merchant of chaos."[15] Cruise had reported that he was beaten by his father, who was a bully and coward. Cruise's family spent part of his childhood in Canada. They moved to the Ottawa suburb of Beacon Hill in late 1971 so that Cruise's father could take a position as a defense consultant with the Canadian Armed Forces.[16] There, Cruise attended the just opened Robert Hopkins Public School for much of grade four as well as grade five.[16][17] In grade four, Cruise first became involved in drama, under the tutelage of George Steinburg. Cruise and six other boys put on an improvised play to music called IT at the Carleton Elementary School drama festival.[16] Drama organizer Val Wright, who was in the audience that night, reflected that "the movement and improvisation were excellent. It was a classic ensemble piece."[16] Cruise also enjoyed sports at the school including playing floor hockey, though he was known more for his aggression than his talent. In sixth grade, Cruise went to Henry Munro Middle School. However, in the spring of that year Cruise's mother left his father, taking Cruise and his sisters back to the United States.[16] His father died of cancer.[18] He briefly attended a Franciscan seminary in Cincinnati on a church scholarship and aspired to become a Catholic priest.[19] In his senior year, he played football for the varsity team as a linebacker, but he was cut from the squad after getting caught drinking beer before a game.[20][21] In total, Cruise attended 15 schools in 14 years, including stints in at least two suburban New Jersey towns, including Glen Ridge.[22]
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