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Soviet politician Vyacheslav Molotov is standing with some of his fellow politician

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Soviet politician Vyacheslav Molotov is standing with some of his fellow politician
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Soviet politician Vyacheslav Molotov is standing with some of his fellow politician
Soviet politician Vyacheslav Molotov is standing with some of his fellow politician
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Soviet politician Vyacheslav Molotov is standing with some of his fellow politician Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov (/ˈmɒləˌtɔːfˌ-ˌtɒf, ˈmoʊlə-ˌˈmɔː-/; Russian: Вячесла́в Миха́йлович Мо́лотов; 9 March [O.S. 25 February] 1890 – 8 November 1986) was a Soviet politician and diplomat, an Old Bolshevik, and a leading figure in the Soviet government from the 1920s, when he rose to power as a protégé of Joseph Stalin. Molotov served as Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars (Premier) from 1930 to 1941, and as Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1939 to 1949 and from 1953 to 1956. He served as First Deputy Premier from 1942 to 1957, when he was dismissed from the Presidium of the Central Committee by Nikita Khrushchev. Molotov retired in 1961 after several years of obscurity. Molotov was the principal Soviet signatory of the Nassi–Soviet non-aggression pact of 1939 (also known as the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact), whose most important provisions were added in the form of a secret protocol that stipulated an invasion of Poland and partition of its territory between Germany and the Soviet Union. This effectively marked the beginning of World War II and made the Soviet Union an unofficial ally of Nassi Germany in the period from 1939 until the German invasion in 1941. During this period, Molotov knew of the Katyn massacre committed by the Soviet authorities. Following the end of World War II (Great Patriotic War), Molotov was involved in negotiations with the Western allies, in which he became noted for his diplomatic skills. He kept his place as a leading Soviet diplomat and politician until 1949. In March of that year, after losing Stalin's favour, he lost the foreign affairs ministry leadership to Andrei Vyshinsky. Molotov's relationship with Stalin deteriorated further, with Stalin complaining about Molotov's mistakes in a speech to the 19th Party Congress. However, after Stalin's death in 1953, Molotov was staunchly opposed to Khrushchev's de-Stalinisation policy. Molotov defended the policies and legacy of Stalin until his death in 1986, and harshly criticised Stalin's successors, especially Khrushchev.

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