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Vintage photo of the crews of Air France Flight 007 before the plane crash in Orly. Photo taken on May 23, 1960.

Vintage photo of the crews of Air France Flight 007 before the plane crash in Orly. Photo taken on May 23, 1960.
Vintage photo of the crews of Air France Flight 007 before the plane crash in Orly. Photo taken on May 23, 1960.
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Vintage photo of the crews of Air France Flight 007 before the plane crash in Orly. Photo taken on May 23, 1960.
Back
Vintage photo of the crews of Air France Flight 007 before the plane crash in Orly. Photo taken on May 23, 1960.
Vintage photo of the crews of Air France Flight 007 before the plane crash in Orly. Photo taken on May 23, 1960.
$19.90
  • SKU: SCAN-NOP-00449020

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Description

Vintage photo of the crews of Air France Flight 007 before the plane crash in Orly. Photo taken on May 23, 1960. Air France Flight 007, a charter flight carrying the elite of Atlanta, Georgia's arts community, crashed on June 3, 1962 while attempting to depart Paris's Orly Airport. The 707 carried 122 passengers and 10 crew and only two survived. The crash was at the time the worst single-aircraft disaster, the first single civilian jet airliner disaster with more than 100 deaths, and the second deadliest aviation disaster in history. According to witnesses, during the takeoff roll on runway 8, the nose of Flight 007 lifted off the runway, but the main landing gear remained on the ground. Even though the aircraft had already exceeded the maximum speed at which the takeoff could be safely aborted within the remaining runway length, the flight crew had no other choice and attempted to abort the take off. With less than 3,000 feet (910 m) of runway remaining, the pilots used wheel brakes and reverse thrust to attempt to stop the 707. They braked so hard they destroyed the main landing gear tires and wheels, but the aircraft ran off the end of the runway. The left undercarriage failed and a fire broke out. Three flight attendants initially survived the disaster. Two attendants seated in the back of the cabin survived, but the third died in the hospital. At the time, it was the world's worst air disaster involving one aircraft. Later investigation found that a motor driving the elevator trim had failed, leaving pilot Captain Roland Hoche and First Officer Jacques Pitoiset unable to complete rotation and liftoff.
Photograph details
SizeText 9.4" x 7.2"

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